Tuesday, January 23, 2018

Winter Recharging Batteries...

After an extended 3-4 week cold spell Dec. 7-Jan. 5th, We have enjoyed some fairly “typical” January temperatures the last 7-10 days.  However, that is not likely to last as the long range model guidance (10-14 days) is bringing back the big dip over the Great Lakes & Northeast.  Why does that make me nervous?  Because the bitterly cold Arctic air (45-50 below zero) is building over Alaska & northern Canada.  A return of the east coast trough will allow that air to flow southward back over the lower 48 states, including us.   More pipe busting freezes are possible during the 1st 2 -3 weeks of February so I would be very cautious replanting any flowers, shrubs & trees that were damaged during the recent freezes.   It’s likely we will have several more mornings in February where we will have to take full precautions (cover outside faucets, drip inside water).  We have about another 4-5 weeks before the higher sun angle will prevent the hard freezes over the South shore.  That doesn’t mean we won’t enjoy some mild days ahead.    It’s just a warning to not put away your parkas, sweaters & mittens just yet.

 

We’ll be slightly below our “normal” highs for the rest of this week with a warming trend arriving on Friday.  Unfortunately, at this time of the year, warmer air usually means higher rain chances and that will be the case by Saturday.  Another Pacific front arrives for Sunday-Monday, but the real cold won’t arrive until the following week…just in time for the Mardi Gras Parades! 

 

Last year my wife & her girlfriend went to see Neil Diamond in the Smoothie King Center during his 50th anniversary tour.  Today it was announced Neil has to cancel the remaining part of his tour due to developing Parkinson’s Disease.  What a pity, what a talent!   His songs are so memorable.  Who doesn’t know the words to Sweet Caroline or You don’t Bring Me Flowers Anymore?   My favorite growing up was Bobby Vee (Veline).  Most of you don’t know Bobby’s band was called to replace/fill in for Buddy Holly, Richie Valens & the Big Bopper after their plane crashed in Iowa.   You can go on line and listen to Bobby’s songs (Rubber Ball, Take Good Care of My Baby, Run to Him) and remember the words like yesterday.  Bobby died a little over a year ago.  It’s sad to watch the great ones leave us, yet their talent’s live on through the internet & You Tube.  Stay tuned! 

2 comments:

Steve said...

Hi Bob,

As you post this blog and mention the -40 and -50 degrees up north, I was searching some New Orleans weather history last evening and came across two interesting events. First, the great New Orleans snowstorm of 1895 that brought 8.2 inches to the downtown area and 10.0 inches to Audubon Park. Second, the great cold outbreak of 1899, when, on February 14th, Mardi Gras Day, we bottomed out at a low of +7 degrees! Before Rex could roll, snow on the route, from the 3 inch snowfall, had to be cleared. Not in any way saying that we'll get that cold, but it's interesting that this year, Mardi Gras is February 13th. Here is a link to a story about that outbreak on nola.com

http://www.nola.com/living/index.ssf/2018/01/1899_mississippi_river_froze_ice_new_olreans_0104218.html

And Bob, you have made a monumental mark on our city, which will not fade for many, many, years to come. Thank you for caring and for being there when the city needed you. Bless you.

Steve

Steve said...

Hi Bob,

Did some searching in New Orleans weather history last evening and came across the New Orleans 1895 8.2 inch snowstorm along with the Great Arctic Outbreak of 1899. During the 1899 outbreak we dipped to +7 degrees in New Orleans on February 14th, Mardi Gras Day of 1899. The Rex route had to be cleared of snow, from the 3 inches that fell, prior to the parade rolling. When I read your last evening's blog this morning in which you mentioned the -45 to -50 degrees in Alaska and Canada my thoughts went right back to last evening. Not saying that we're going to get that cold, but it just so happens that Mardi Gras, this year, falls on February 13th. Seems that our coldest weather sometimes occurs during the first two weeks of February.
On a different note, your legacy in this city will be one of kindness and concern in the way that you treated people and genuinely cared for all of us during many severe weather events, post notably Hurricane Katrina. Your legacy will remain with us for many, many years to come. Thank you so much.

Steve